Monday, December 6, 2010

I.N.K. News for December and BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS

News:

Books by several I.N.K. bloggers are among the winners of the first annual Eureka! Nonfiction Children’s Book Awards issued in October by the California Reading Association. Barbara Kerley’s The Extraordinary Mark Twain (According to Susy) was a Eureka! Gold Award winner, while Eureka! Silver Honor Books included Bylines: A Photobiography of Nellie Bly by Sue Macy, Down, Down, Down: A Journey to the Bottom of the Sea by Steve Jenkins, Under the Snow by Melissa Stewart, and The Boy Who Invented TV: The Story of Philo Farnsworth and Lives of the Pirates: Swashbucklers, Scoundrels (Neighbors Beware!) by past blogger Kathleen Krull.

Melissa Stewart will be presenting at the TED Women's Conference at the Paley Center for Media in Washington D.C. from a satellite location at Olin College in Needham, MA at 1:00 on December 6. http://conferences.ted.com/TEDWomen/

Penny Colman is joining Ink Think Tank and Ink Link:Authors on Call. Penny has written major award-winning books on women's history. Check out her website: http://www.pennycolman.com/

Vicki Cobb is covering the WISE - World Innovation Summit for Education - to be held in Doha, Qatar from December the 7th to the 9th 2010 for Education Update newspaper. She'll undoubtedly be blogging about it for I.N.K.







Book Recommendations:

From Cheryl Harness: As I write, 28 November, 2010, let me note that today is the 115th anniversary of America's first
automobile race. I note it here because author/illustrator Michael Dooling did a grand job of showing
and telling all about the event in his book, The Great Horse-less Carriage Race. And, with another
Christmas bearing down upon us all, I'll be reading & recommending Jim Murphy's grand book about
the impromptu Yuletide TRUCE, celebrated by English and German soldiers, caught up in the Great
and Terrible War, in 1914.


Books from Melissa Stewart:
Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream by Tanya Lee Stone

Born to Be Giants: How Baby Dinosaurs Grew to Rule the World by Lita Judge

Charles and Emma: The Darwin’s Leap of Faith by Deborah Heiligman

The Day-Glo Brothers by Chris Barton (illus. Tony Persiani)

An Egg is Quiet by Dianna Hutts Aston (illus. Sylvia Long)




How Many Ways Can You Catch a Fly? by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page

Lucy Long Ago: Uncovering the Mysteries of Where We Came From by Catherine Thimmesh

Marching for Freedom: Walk Together Children and Don’t You Grow Weary by Elizabeth Partridge

Meet the Howlers by April Pulley Sayre (illus. Woody Miller)

Neo Leo: The Ageless Ideas of Leonard da Vinci by Gene Baretta

Nic Bishop Spiders by Nic Bishop

Planting the Trees of Kenya: The Story of Wangari Maathai by Claire A. Nivola

Redwoods by Jason Chin

River of Words: the Story of William Carlos Williams by Jen Bryant (illus. by Melissa Sweet)

Ubiquitous: Celebrating Nature’s Survivors by Joyce Sidman (illus. Beckie Prange)

Under the Snow by Melissa Stewart (illus. Constance R. Bergum)


Volcano Wakes Up! by Lisa Westberg Peters (illus. Steve Jenkins)

Vulture View by April Pulley Sayre (illus. Steve Jenkins)

What to Do About Alice? How Alice Roosevelt Broke the Rules, Charmed the World, and Drove Her Father Teddy Crazy! by Barbara Kerley (illus. Edwin Fotheringham)

When the Wolves Returned: Restoring Nature’s Balance in Yellowstone by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent (photos Dan and Cassie Hartman)

Where in the Wild? Camouflaged Creatures Concealed and Revealed by David Schwartz and Yael Schy (photos Dwight Kuhn)



Wolfsnail: A Backyard Predator by Sarah C. Campbell and Richard P. Campbell


From Susan Goodman:

I have two new favorite nonfiction books to recommend for presents this year.

I’ve always been intrigued that poetry is grouped with nonfiction, but In the Wild by David Elliott definitely belongs in our stable. Elliott’s poems are short, but magically capture the essence of the wild animals he describes, as do Holly Meade’s bright, bold woodcuts.


Jimi: Sounds like a Rainbow, by Gary Golio, is poetry in prose. This book tells the story of how Jimi Hendrix became an artist, but it also shows how any artist learns his or her craft by looking, listening, and taking in what the world has to offer.

5 comments:

Jim Murphy said...

Congratulations to all of the Eureka! (I love that exclamation point!)Award winner/honorees. Great books need to be recognized and read and then shared with as many readers as possible.

Gretchen Woelfle said...

Hurrah for our INK award winners!

Susan Kuklin said...

Congratulations to all INK Eureka! Winners.

And to everyone who blogs for INK. You are all winners in my book.

Gary Golio said...

Susan (Goodman)--
Thanks for those lovely words about JIMI. Much appreciated!

Gary Golio

Susan E. Goodman said...

Gary--perhaps they are much appreciated, but they are much deserved. I don't know if you ended up feeling that you hit the bar on that book--I felt you did. As an author, it doesn't happen all the time. Isn't it great when it does?